Cos, Tan, Sin, mention to manual about Degrees and Radians.

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Bugala
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:11 pm

Cos, Tan, Sin, mention to manual about Degrees and Radians.

Post by Bugala »

I just started re-educating myself in trigonometry, and I first thought that Hollywood had a bug when trying to solve some problems using Sin(), Cos(), Tan().

This was since Hollywood uses Radians instead of Degrees by default, and I didn't even realise there are two different things existing (I still don't know the difference between them yet).

Therefore I think it would be good to emphasize in manual on Sin(), Cos(), Tan() that these commands are using Radiants INSTEAD of degrees. For I did notice the Radiant in description, but I just thought it was another word for Degrees.

Also, you could mention in those places that you can convert them to Degrees by using the Deg() command. Since some beginners might not realise to check for something like that.

SamuraiCrow
Posts: 396
Joined: Fri May 15, 2015 5:15 pm
Location: Waterville, Minnesota USA

Re: Cos, Tan, Sin, mention to manual about Degrees and Radians.

Post by SamuraiCrow »

Code: Select all

Function p_deg(rad#)
   Return(180*rad#/pi#)
EndFunction
I'm on registered MorphOS using FlowStudio.

Bugala
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:11 pm

Re: Cos, Tan, Sin, mention to manual about Degrees and Radians.

Post by Bugala »

@samuraiCrow

seems I actually put wrong command. not Deg() but Rad() needs to be used, as in result = Sin(Rad(55))

But thanks for the function anyway, that made me actually understand better the difference between radius and degree.

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airsoftsoftwair
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Re: Cos, Tan, Sin, mention to manual about Degrees and Radians.

Post by airsoftsoftwair »

Bugala wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 10:32 am
Therefore I think it would be good to emphasize in manual on Sin(), Cos(), Tan() that these commands are using Radiants INSTEAD of degrees. For I did notice the Radiant in description, but I just thought it was another word for Degrees.

Also, you could mention in those places that you can convert them to Degrees by using the Deg() command. Since some beginners might not realise to check for something like that.
Since the documentation mentions radians already, I don't think this needs to be changed. But you're right that adding a reference to Deg() might be useful for people not too familiar with trigonometry.

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